Does my cat need a scratching tree?

Share on 2018-04-10
Scratching the tree - more than just claw care

Cats need to scratch to sharpen and groom their claws, to relieve their muscular culture and sometimes just for fun or to relieve stress. 

If you want to avoid your furniture being marked by scratch marks, then you should offer your pelt-nose attractive alternatives to scratch on instead. 

Buying a scratching post can save your sofa, curtains and even wallpaper from being scratched. When your cat scratches an object, it removes the outer dead skin of the nail and releases the healthy new growth underneath. If you look at the place where your pelt-nose likes to scratch, you'll probably find several crescent-shaped nail fragments that are hollow inside. What looks at first glance as if your cat has torn out the entire nail is fortunately only the old horny layer of the claw, which only falls off when new claw horn has grown back. 
 
In addition to maintaining the claws, scratching the scratching post is a very effective way for your cat to stretch her back and shoulder muscles. By stretching and pushing the back, the muscles can be relieved. Scratching is also used as a relaxation valve. If your cat is anxious, happy, excited or frustrated, scratching can help him release some of these built-up emotions.

The right place for the scratching tree

In order for the scratching post to be used, you must place it in the right place. Cats tend to look for the nearest place to the front door to scratch. Observe your cat's behaviour and you'll find out where he spends most of his time. Then you can place the scratching post there.

Once you have found the right place for the scratching tree, the next step is to make it appealing to your cat. You can use catnip to lure your cat near the tree. You can also start by tying a little catnip to the scratching post so that she follows the scent again and again. It is also helpful if you sit next to the scratching post and play with your cat.